This book would have existed after Mosey's time, but in the fictional world of Pig Girl and Mosey, this is the magazine the kids created.

I had a magic foyer in my old house growing up.  It had two closet doors with mirrors on them facing each other.  It was a small, shadowy and cool space seldom used.  When you stood in there and looked at yourself, you were reflected in the mirrors, smaller and smaller, forever.  That feeling-- infiniteness, the back being the front, and so on and so on, (because "so on and so on" is really a feeling)...that's one of the themes seems to end up in what I write, a lot. My tale is set in the sixties, but those kids are discovering the past then and as they do, it just goes on deeper and deeper and so on and so on.  The Foxfire Book always had that feeling to me.  Instead of calling the words collected in there timeless, I'd call them endless.  They have a purpose that really has no end. 

Butter churning. 

Butter churning. 

This book, and there are several other compilation books from the magazine's long run, was in my family library since I was real small.  We were New York City folks and the most country I'd seen was Long Island or East Hampton.  All these pictures and words were alien to my experience.

Planting by the signs.

Planting by the signs.

I always was drawn to it, though. I could read very early, but I was sort of a wild child and couldn't slow down and think for myself consciously till I got older.  So, though I stared at the pictures and read around them, I just kept the book as a treasure and only "got it" recently.  I always had the feeling from the youngest age, it was a special book and must be mine.

 Planting with the signs makes no sense to me at all, still, and yet it's utterly fascinating. 

Hog dressing.

Hog dressing.

And here is the page that inspired the pig people in Pig Girl and Mosey.